DIANA VISHNEVA: ON THE EDGE
LES BALLET DE MONTE-CARLO
Kings of the Dance Tickets
POLINA SEMIONOVA & FRIENDS
SOLO FOR TWO: NATALIA OSIPOVA & IVAN VASILIEV
MIKHAILOVSKY BALLET
Eifman Ballet
MARIINSKY BALLET

Mariinsky Theater of St. Petersburg

Title: Review: Mariinsky Ballet's Swan Lake dancers poetry in motion
Author: Michael Crabb
Date: March 2, 2011
Publisher: TheStar.com

However dazzling its stars, the rock bed of any great classical ballet company is its female corps. When it comes to the poetry of motion the women of St. Petersburg's mighty Mariinsky Ballet are unsurpassed and rarely equalled. [read more]

Title: Review: La Bayadère by the Mariinsky (Kirov) Ballet
Author: NATASHA GAUTHIER
Date: February 25, 2011
Publisher: Ottawa Citizen

Like plays within a play, many classical ballets feature dance itself, or the idea of dance, as a major element of the plot. Poor deceived, deserted Giselle dances herself to death. In Coppelia, the village heartthrob ditches his girlfriend for a life-size dancing doll. And the title character of La Bayadère is a temple dancer who must give the performance of her life even as her heart is crumbling to pieces. [read more]

Title: Kirov's Spirited Nymphs, Swans Shimmer in Classic Ballet Briefs
Author: Tobi Tobias
Date: April 10, 2008
Publisher: BloombergNews

Ethereal spirits of the wood, dream visions of love, luscious adulterers and a tragically expiring swan -- the Kirov Ballet can offer them all in a one-man show.
The company's second program -- in an engagement that runs through April 20 at New York's City Center -- offered four key ballets from the early 20th century by Michel Fokine. The choreographer was a neo-Romantic reformer who countered the diamantine brilliance of the 19th-century master Marius Petipa with a pearly glow. [read more]

Title: Classic style
Author: Hilary Ostlere
Date: April 7 2008
Publisher: The Financial Times

This legendary company, not seen in New York for six years, is appearing for the first time in the venue where Balanchine made his original home for City Ballet before it moved to Lincoln Center. If at times the Kirov looked crowded on a smaller stage than it is used to, that did not diminish the pleasures of opening night. No question, the Kirov is a glorious dancing machine with a matchless corps de ballet and extraordinary young soloists. [read more]

Title: Tough moves and cool poise
Author: Hilary Ostlere
Date: April 17 2008
Publisher: The Financial Times

Taken in the spirit of a retrospective, an evening devoted to four William Forsythe ballets is not as unusual as it sounds, even for the Kirov. Some love his work, others loathe it. My own feeling about this controversial choreographer is, to borrow one of his ballet's titles, in the middle, somewhat elevated.[read more]

Title: From Russia with style
Author: Hilary Ostlere
Date: April 22 2008
Publisher: The Financial Times

The Kirov do not dance Balanchine as if to the manner born. But the all-Balanchine programme that concluded the Kirov's visit to the US proved that the company could dance his works as well as and sometimes better than, currently, New York City Ballet, the company that the choreographer founded with Lincoln Kirstein when he came to America.[read more]

Title: Kirov Ballet challenges dancers, viewers at City Center
Author: Robert Johnson
Date: April 16 2008
Publisher: The Star Ledger

Conviction and daring are not qualities one associates with American ballet these days. The Kirov Ballet, however, still owns them in full measure. ??The Russian company, which performs at New York City Center through Sunday, believes completely in what it does. It seems untroubled by the encroaching banalities of modern life, and its self-confidence and integrity explain why even less than perfect performances remain compelling. The Kirov expects mature consideration from its audiences to match the dedication of its dancers, and expects both dancers and viewers to make fine distinctions.[read more]

Title: DOLL HOUSES
Author: Joan Acocella
Date: April 21 2008
Publisher: The New Yorker

The puppet and her puppeteer in "Petrushka." Photograph by Josef Astor.
At this moment, no theatre artist in New York is showing more poetic force or technical skill than the puppeteer Basil Twist. By now, after Julie Taymor's production of "The Lion King," it should not be hard to convince people that puppetry can be part of serious art, and the world has not ignored Basil Twist. His work has repeatedly been presented at Lincoln Center, to loving reviews, and he has won a lot of awards. Still, he is not a household name. He should be.[read more]

Title: The Kirov's Old-World Virtues and Perversities
Author: Robert Gottlieb
Date: April 14 2008
Publisher: The New York Observer

The first time the Kirov ballet was seen in America was on Sept. 11, 1961. The ballet was Swan Lake. The ballerina was Inna Zubkovskaya. The place was the old Met, on what must have been one of the hottest nights of the year, and there was no air-conditioning. As I remember it, our secretary of state and the Russian ambassador were sitting in the center box with their dinner jackets off, trying to look dignified as they melted, and the curtain was extremely late-Zubkovskaya, we later heard, was fainting from the heat backstage.[read more]

Title: The Kirov's Modern Kick
Author: Robert Gottlieb
Date: April 28 2008
Publisher: The New York Observer

The Kirov is a great ballet company because it has so many terrific dancers, but it doesn't always know what to do with them. The dancers-here for a three-week season, just ended, at the City Center-were under a handicap: The stage is so much smaller than their own, in St. Petersburg, that the company's classical works in particular looked cramped and unhappy. But this isn't why these standard pieces-the heart of the old Kirov/Maryinsky repertory-were the least convincing of everything we were shown.[read more]

Title: Radiant Line of Russian Style Energized in a Triplet of Balanchines
Author: Alastair Macaulay
Date: April 21 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

A colleague of Serge Diaghilev (1872-1929) shrewdly wrapped up that great impresario's work into three categories: "To reveal Russia to itself; to reveal Russia to the world; to reveal the world - the new world - to itself." We can now see that a fourth project remained: to reveal that new world to Russia. Only after the Iron Curtain had lifted, decades after his death, could that be possible.[read more]

Title: Kirov: Traditional Yet Reworkable
Author: Alastair Macaulay
Date: April 22 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

Almost three weeks ago, I suggested in these pages that Lady Bracknell had gained employment as ballet mistress to the Kirov Ballet. In "The Importance of Being Earnest" she says: "The two weak points in our age are its want of principle and its want of profile. The chin a little higher, dear. Style largely depends on the way the chin is worn."[read more]

Title: At the Kirov, Can Too Many Cooks Spoil the Ballet?
Author: Alastair Macaulay
Date: April 10 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

During most of the third program in the Kirov Ballet's season at City Center - a quadruple bill of excerpts from late-19th-century ballets by Marius Petipa - an alarming question kept flashing into my mind: "Maybe I don't like ballet after all?" Here were virtuoso episodes from "Le Corsaire" and "Don Quixote"; here was the "Diana and Acteon" pas de deux; here came salvo after salvo of audience applause. And almost all of it left me cold.[read more]

Title: Still More Faces of the Kirov in Fokine's Dramatic Poetry and Lander's 'Études'
Author: Alastair Macaulay
Date: April 14 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

The Kirov Ballet's current three-week season at New York City Center comprises six different programs of repertory. Since five of these are more or less devoted to individual choreographers, the advance impression is that the Kirov is a great custodian company, devoted to choreography above all else.[read more]

Title: Chopin in the Moonlight, Drenched in History Yet Fresh in the West
Author: Alastair Macaulay
Date: April 07 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

"Chopiniana", which opened the Kirov's recent quadruple bill at City Center of ballets by Michel Fokine, is 100 years old this year. This is the plotless, Romantic dream-world, poet-muse ballet that used to be known - very well known - in the West as "Les Sylphides", the title Diaghilev gave it in 1909 when he also gave it a different overture and a new décor, by Alexandre Benois. It was said to be Diaghilev's favorite ballet, and for decades it was the epitome of what many dancegoers wanted from ballet: atmosphere, romanticism, poetry.[read more]

Title: Catapulted Into the Present Tense
Author: Roslyn Sulcas
Date: April 17 2008
Publisher: The New York Times

The Kirov Ballet's performances at City Center over the last two weeks exemplify the way that classical dance can appear dazzlingly lightweight, almost entirely divorced from the content that once rendered this work meaningful to its audiences. But ballet can look and feel as contemporary as any other art, and on Tuesday night the Kirov appeared in four works by Willam Forsythe that catapulted the dancers into the present tense.[read more]